To know Him, and be known by Him

This is the excerpt for your very first post.

CA221981-9085-4AEB-80DD-509BB5968683

Because it’s true.

Why does a Baptist-turned-Reformed-Presbyterian enter the Roman Catholic Church?  Short answer:  Because it’s true.  Long answer:  It gets really long and complicated; hence this blog.  The short answer, however, mustn’t be overlooked.  It was a matter of conscience.

None of us asked for the 500-year schism in the Church.  We were born in the 20th century, or later.   The sixteenth century was a long time ago.  If you are reading this blog, chances are the Catholic-Protestant question is important to you like it is to me.  I was born into a particular denominational soup, so my road may seem foreign even to many Protestants.  The fact there are so many soups is part of the answer to what seemed an unanswerable conundrum.

On September 10, 2017, by God’s grace, I was received into the Roman Catholic Church. That was seventeen years to the day I began reading the Catechism of the Roman Catholic Church.  I don’t read that slowly.  I hit a stumbling block.  The journey had long grown cold when, in the Spring of this 2017, I stumbled back on its path.  In this blog I try to trace some of the lines of the journey, pausing to comment on markers I found along the way.  I do it because I am convinced the fullness of the faith is in the Catholic Church.

Protestants in my past introduced me to Jesus and taught me to esteem Sacred Scripture.  For that I am eternally grateful.  I want to be a faithful witness for Jesus Christ, His cross and resurrection; His Passion and Lordship. I want to introduce my family, friends and neighbors to the Catholic Church.  There is only one Body of Christ.  It is true and good and beautiful.

Ultimately, I want to know Him and be known by Him.  I want to make Him known.  Thank you for reading.  If you find anything here with merit, please Subscribe and please Share on your favorite social media.  And you will be contributing as well.  Blessings.

Go to All Roads Lead to Rome

9FC6F754-5EB5-4B8B-909D-F7B960269766

Cathedral-Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, Mobile, Alabama where I came into the Church.

As for me, I know that my vindicator lives, and that he will at last stand forth upon the dust. This will happen when my skin has been stripped off, and from my flesh I will see God: I will see for myself, my own eyes, not another’s, will behold him: my inmost being is consumed with longing. Job 19:25-27

Author: Danny Collier

Catholic husband, father, lawyer

2 thoughts on “To know Him, and be known by Him”

  1. I think the gates of hell have prevailed against Rome, and against lots of other churches, but suppose they haven’t prevailed against the Roman Catholic Church, suppose Rome and only Rome is God’s True Church. The intelligent move is to always obey Rome, because you won’t get cast into hell for rebelling against Rome, if Rome is God’s True Church, if you don’t rebel against Rome. The Cafeteria Catholics make no sense. Rome is either God’s True Church or else Rome is lost in heresy. Obey Rome if Rome is God’s True Church. Renounce Rome if Rome isn’t. Simple stuff…. Look at 1 Timothy 4. 1-3. Seems like that scripture is targeted right at Rome. But if not, if Rome is God’s True Church, how do you convince Cafeteria Catholics that they are crazy to rebel against Rome? Look at Catholics like Nancy Pelosi and Joe Biden. Why can’t they get with the program and be pro-life and anti-gay-marriage? Well of course they want to win votes to win elections. Why doesn’t Rome excommunicated them? Why doesn’t Rome try to disciple these people to help them get out of their Cafeteria Cathic delusion, to help them avoid eternal hell? Because Rome is all about amassing worldly power. If Rome excommunicated every Cafeteria Catholic, that would be about 95% of all Catholics. Rome would lose lots of power. But then, if I’m wrong, if Rome is God’s True Church, there’s nothing preventing lay Catholics, lay Practicing Catholics, from trying to talk sense into Cafeteria Catholics – into those Catholics who rebel against Rome. Thanks for hearing me out.

    Like

  2. Bill,

    I’m glad you posted and thanks for reading. While I disagree with your conclusion, I appreciate your logic. We agree that if the Catholic Church holds the true faith, then submission to the church is of supreme importance; and if the Church does not, denouncing Her is the only proper response. I denounced the Church for many years before being taken in by Her. I don’t understand indifferentism.

    On the matter of cafeteria Catholics, I cannot conceive of that not being a reality. If the Catholic Church is the church, and if there are to be wheat and tares until the end, then that will take a certain form by necessity. That means, for example, on the lay level, there will be bad politicians, bad businessmen and bad school teachers in it for the wrong reasons.* It means there will be bad priests and bad bishops. But because the church is what it is, there are objective markers within which one might truly take a stand and contend for a known and knowable faith.

    You mentioned 1 Timothy 4:1-3. I used to hold pet objections to the Roman Catholic Church. I’m not dismissing your objection out of hand; only taking the chance to say that I once held objections which, once I dug in and stopped relying on anti-Catholic authors and preachers, started to vanish. I let the Church defend Herself. As for asceticism, there is so little expected of the faithful that it’s almost embarrassing. As for priestly celibacy, the Church’s discipline (not dogma) is quite Scriptural and beautiful when you actually study it. I will let other apologists answer your objection, but I encourage you to write them all down in a list. And dig in.

    Blessings on the journey,

    Danny

    *I don’t contrast “bad Catholics” with myself, as if I’ve arrived and I’m one of the good ones. We are all to be constantly repenting and converting. But I get your point about public figures holding positions patently contrary to the Church’s teaching.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s